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Understanding Perimeter Induction Units: How They Work & What Makes Them Effective

Recent improvements in PIU (Perimeter Induction Units) efficiency have led to owners, engineers, and architects searching for replacement models that are capable, adaptable, and able to deliver within a specified blanket space. An effective control mechanism can be constructed to link PIU with a building’s BACnet system, enabling it to change the amount of air or water as needed depending on the occupancy of the facility. 

The Perimeter Induction Unit comes in a range of sizes to best meet any retrofit application or size that already exists. It may be sized to fit any available space. Available with a drain pan on both a floor mount and a perimeter ceiling mount. Units with a high induction ratio are also available in low-noise and high-capacity models. 

Evolution of Induction Units 

Between the 1950s and 1990s, perimeter induction units (PIU) were frequently installed in big buildings. They were frequently specified since they were more effective than all other air systems of the time, needed less ducting, and used fans with lower volumes and powers. 

Numerous of these units were kept in good condition and are still in use today. However, many of them are now being looked at for replacement after 40 to 60 years. Investors, building owners, facility managers, and letting agents are actively considering whether to repair or replace them with new induction units or to completely overhaul the building’s climate infrastructure. 

Energy-efficient Perimeter Induction units 

With many business towers choosing to upgrade with HVAC induction units over alternative VAV-type systems, perimeter induction units are once again popular. Induction units made by EB Air Control are energy-efficient, silent, and sleek in form. They can also be tailored to fit any space. 

Given that operating so many units zone-wise at desired options offers a significant benefit, several building operators will target the VAV option on Induction units. Compared to conventional HVAC induction units that operate at constant volume or ON/OFF operations, this offers significant energy and financial savings. 

How does the Induction Unit work? 

Recent improvements in PIU (Perimeter Induction Unit) efficiency have led to owners, engineers, and architects searching for replacement models that are capable, adaptable, and able to deliver within a specified blanket space. An effective control mechanism can be constructed to link PIU with a building’s BACnet system. It enables the change of the amount of air or water as needed depending on the occupancy of the facility. 

The induction unit comes in a range of sizes to best meet any retrofit application or size that already exists. It may be sized to fit any available space. Available with a drain pan on both a floor mount and a perimeter ceiling mount. Units with a high induction ratio are also available in low-noise and high-capacity models. 

Replacement options 

The first choice is to switch out induction units for another type of system. Operators of buildings can change to a fan and coil system, although doing so would necessitate installing new ducting.  Finding room for the additional ductwork can be difficult if the induction units were a part of the building’s original architecture or if it was constructed before central HVAC systems were popular. 

The ductless split system is an additional choice; it employs smaller indoor units and a larger exterior unit. This is comparable to the induction system in terms of both design and functionality, which could appeal to users. Additionally, these systems use very little energy. The drawback of a split system is that there is no air exchange, hence ventilation needs to be considered. 

Conclusion 

A perimeter induction unit is a relatively modern technology for companies and facilities. However, induction units have become a primary tool for HVAC systems. Using Perimeter induction units, you can maximize the potential of your HVAC system. 

ebair_wpUnderstanding Perimeter Induction Units: How They Work & What Makes Them Effective